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Steven C. Sorensen – Photography and Blog

Tag Archives: Chippewa River

Frozen

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Portrait Of the Artist As a Frozen Man

Sorry, this isn’t about the Disney movie, it’s about my day out in the cold working on my project to photograph the Chippewa River from source to end.  It was cold: 2° F with a wind chill of -10°.  I was not uncomfortable because I dressed for the weather.  (I recently purchased what I suspect was the last pair of XXL long johns in Stillwater.  I admit my outfit was not very fashionable, but it worked.)  The only problem was my hands.  I had to take off my choppers to take photos.  In areas exposed to the wind, I could only manage two or three shots until my hands became too numb to operate the camera.

When I stood still, all I could hear was the wind hissing through the dry grass and the river ice occasionally booming and popping.   When I walked, I heard the fresh snow squeaking beneath my boots and the old, frozen boards of the bridge deck creaking and snapping under my weight.  I didn’t see another soul all afternoon.

 

 

 

 

A Dark Wood

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The day before yesterday I finished “In a Dark, Dark Wood”, the scary thriller by Ruth Ware*.  Yesterday I unexpectedly found myself in a dark wood.

My hike took longer than expected, and I forgot that daylight savings time ended recently.  It gets dark very early these days.

So I’m trudging through a dark wood.  There is absolutely no wind, and no creatures are stirring, not even a mouse.  They have all gone south or into hibernation for the winter or have bedded down for the evening.  I can hear a jet far up in the sky but nothing else.  It’s actually a beautiful evening.  More than once I stop to enjoy the quiet and the beauty of the color left behind by the setting sun, color that shows brightly in the crisp, clear evening air.

I was in the Dunnville Bottoms in the floodplain of the Chippewa River in Western Wisconsin.  Here are some scenes from the dark, dark woods in the bottoms, mostly oak forests with many old, gnarly, spooky oaks.

 

 


I thought the book was neither scary nor thrilling, just an average, somewhat entertaining who-done-it.

 

 

Sundown On the Chippewa

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Yesterday around sunset I was at what I consider the most beautiful vantage point on the Chippewa River, or at least it was last night.

Panorama From the North Bank Facing South

I was also on the exposed bedrock along the river near Jim Falls, Wisconsin.  The river has carved out numerous potholes.  I went there yesterday to photograph the potholes.

 

 

 

 

 

A Week’s Worth

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I made two day trips this week, one to explore the East Fork Of the Chippewa River in Wisconsin, the other a drive through the rolling hills southeast of Independence in Trempealeau County, Wisconsin.

Trempealeau County

East Fork Of the Chippewa River and Things Found Along the Way

One Shot From a Stillwater Parking Lot

Transmission Towers

Bottoms and Barrens

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On the Old Railroad (now bike) bridge over the Chippewa River

I’ve been exploring the Chippewa River this spring and late winter in the stretch of river between Eau Claire and the Mississippi River near Pepin, Wisconsin.  Much of the terrain along this part of the river is barrens such as the Dunnville Barrens and bottoms such as the Dunnville Bottoms.  And yes, a bottoms can be a barrens.

Bottoms, as in bottomlands, are “low-lying land along a watercourse”  [Merriam-Webster.com].  Barrens are “level or slightly rolling land, usually with a sandy soil and few trees, and relatively infertile.”  [dictionary.com.]  So bottomland can be barren but not necessarily, and barrens can be on bottomland, but not necessarily.

This is part of the Dunnville Barrens State Natural Area within the Dunnville Bottoms.

This is a fun area to explore.  It encompasses the Dunnville Barrens State Natural Area, Dunnville Bottoms, the Dunnville State Wildlife Area, and the Dunnville State Rec Area and Sandbar (great for swimming).  The Red Cedar State Trail runs along its southern edge, crosses the river on an old railroad bridge, and ends at its intersection with the Chippewa River State Trail.  The Chippewa River State Trail runs along the river between Eau Claire and Durand.

 

 

Universal Law Of Geography

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Sundown On the River Bottoms (1)

I mapped my hike before setting out today.  According to Google Maps, it would be 2000 feet from the parking lot to the river, 2000 back.  However, the universal law of geography kicked in not long after I started the hike.  I learned this rule in college on the first day of Geography 101.  The rule is that in nature, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight line.  There are always intervening ravines, impenetrable thickets, fierce and angry thorns, deep woods, wet ground, mean bulls (happened to me once, I swear).  Columbus ran into a continent.  Don’t forget the next-ridge corollary to the universal law.  When you finally reach the ridge you’ve been straining for, there is always one more ridge to go.

The universal law kicked in today.  I knew  I would be hiking over level ground and open fields with a band of trees along the river.  Should have been easy, even for me in my febrile old age.

Later:  I am now seated at the bar of a Mexican restaurant, an oasis for an exhausted, muscle-sore hiker trying to recover from what ended up a challenge.  Even so, I’m glad I went and finished the hike.  I captured some decent photos for my project on the Chippewa River.  Here is another universal law I learned in college but not in the classroom:  a cold beer (in this case Dos Equis Lager) never tastes so good as when one is tired and dry.  It tastes great and you can tell yourself that you’ve earned your beer, and the next one, and . . .

Here are some other photos from the hike in the Lower Chippewa River State Natural Area southwest of Eau Claire, Wisconsin.

 

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