New Challenges

I am starting two new challenges:  to cover the segment of the North Country National Scenic Trail in Wisconsin and to read fifty classic books over the next five years.

North Country Trail Near Gordon, Wisconsin
North Country Trail Near Gordon, Wisconsin

North Country National Scenic Trail

I’m not sure I’ll be able to complete this challenge given my age and the state of my health.  I intend to have fun trying.   I used the verb “cover” in the first paragraph above because some of the trail follows roads so I’ll be able to drive.  The rest I’ll have to hike – definitely a challenge since I can manage only a mile or two at a time.

The North Country Trail Association describes the trail as  “the longest in the National Trails System, stretching 4,600 miles over 7 states from the middle of North Dakota to the Vermont border of New York.  The stretch in Wisconsin is 207 miles and runs from the Minnesota – Wisconsin border near Superior, Wisconsin to where the Wisconsin – Michigan border meets Lake Superior.

Fifty Classic Books

The Classics Club sponsors this challenge that I fully expect to complete.

Here are the club’s ground rules:

  • Choose fifty classic books.  I’ve chosen fifty novels.
  • Post the list on your blog.  My list is here.
  • Choose a reading-completion goal date up to five years in the future.  My date is November 1, 2023.
  • Write a review of each book when finished reading it and post it on your blog.
  • Submit each book review to The Classics Club website.

I haven’t officially started yet.  I have to finish a couple of the books I’m currently reading.  I’ll start in a couple of weeks with Alfred Döblin’s Berlin Alexanderplatz.

Parnell Prairie Preserve

I went out in my car around 4:00 PM.  I wanted to try to walk to the Arcola Railroad bridge from the Wisconsin side to photograph it.  No luck; there were no-parking signs along the road and the railroad right-of-way was posted with no-trespassing signs.  I could see the bridge through the bare trees.  It looked very high and impressive.  The branches were too thick for photography so I never got a photo of the bridge.

Parnell Prairie Preserve

I turned to Plan B.  I didn’t actually have a Plan B, so I extemporized.  The Parnell Prairie Preserve is just a few miles from where I was.  I’ve driven past the preserve many times and drove into the parking lot once but never stopped.  It didn’t look very impressive from the road.  So I went to the Preserve and discovered a sweet spot.  Nice trails.  Very pleasant.

There was an old, decaying very large tree trunk sawed into pieces near the road.  It looked like it had been there, decaying and moldering into the earth, for a long time.  All the things that grow on or around a decomposing tree stump provide lots of subjects for photography:  vines, lichen, moss, fungi, leaves, stems, thorns.  Much texture and color.  The color isn’t as showy as in wildflower season but it’s there if you look closely.  Tiny, bright red things on stalks held over green moss.  I don’t know what they were, but the red objects shone out in spite of their tininess.  Purple and red vines.  Old, decaying wood of a deep orange.

Most of the preserve is a rolling meadow.  Last year’s meadow grasses are still standing and are a fine golden, yellow-orange color.

The red stems of sumac with buds just waiting for some sun and warm weather.  A cluster of berries ranging in color from bright red to golden brown.  The silhouettes of bare trees and pine trees on a hilltop.

 

 

Stumbling Around In the Woods

Trail On the Ridge
Trail On the Ridge

I wrote this post a year ago, March 21, 2016.  For some reason, I forgot to publish it.  Better late than never.

I went to the Wind In the Pines Nature Park yesterday.  As has happened before in the park, I was unable to follow the trails.  The trail map in the parking lot showed that to follow the route I chose, I should go left at the first fork and left again at the next T-intersection.  I didn’t find either of those things before coming to the end of the trail.  I tried to follow what seemed an obvious alternative.  The alternative was a very faint trail, but judging by the terrain I thought I was at least in the right area.  The trail faded in and out but I was always able to find some sort of trail, sometimes very faint.  I eventually came to an easy-to-follow trail marked by stone cairns.

Lo and behold, I came out in a different parking lot in a different natural and scientific area that I never knew existed.  That explains why so many signs I saw were facing the wrong direction.  The area I stumbled upon is the Falls Creek State Natural Area managed by the Minnesota DNR.  By the end of my hike, I hadn’t taken very many steps, but I ended the days with around 40 floors of vertical movement according to my Fitbit, most of it in crossing and re-crossing what I think was the same gulch in the forest, one that carried a very nice, small stream.

Most of the better photos I took were of small things.  I was often on my hands and knees or sitting to get close to the subject.